Thursday, January 8, 2015

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Group Launches Radiation Protection Project

Today at a press conference in Augusta, a group launched a new program to protect residents from nuclear power plant accidents.  The group, Concerned Citizens of Shell Bluff, will be meeting with residents of Augusta, Waynesboro and nearby communities within the emergency zone around the Plant Vogtle nuclear power station.  The project centers on one of the most dangerous pollutants, radioactive iodine, which can affect the thyroid gland. Beginning Saturday, the citizen’s group will hold a series of educational events which will provide protective potassium iodide tablets to residents in the potential fallout zone.  Potassium iodide is a harmless salt which when taken properly can prevent the cancers and other negative health effects of radioactive iodine emitted during a nuclear accident.  Rev. Charles Utley, the leader of the program, said, “We realize that this is not a one-time fix all project but a catalyst to equip the residents with the necessary knowledge and tools needed.”   He said that the group has secured donations from a private foundation which will help provide enough potassium iodide tablets to protect hundreds of the families most at risk.  Meetings will be held in local churches, community clubs and stores in the target area. The group displayed a diagram of the thyroid gland which will be used to give a clear picture of the function and protection of this gland.The program will also consist of a public information campaign to include newspapers, radio and person-to-person advertisement.  Claude Howard, a member of the group, said, “We will use every possible avenue to get the word out to reach the maximum number of people.”  The group will hold community meetings to establish contact information and to assist in case of a nuclear accident or melt down.  He added, “The overall object of this project is to provide the education and tools needed to be better trained and equipped to protect ourselves and our families from radioactive fall-out.”Lou Zeller, Executive Director of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, said, “The US Food and Drug Administration has concluded that potassium iodide is an effective and safe means of reducing the risk of thyroid cancer in people who inhale or ingest radioactive iodine-131 after a nuclear accident.”  He added, “It’s best to be prepared.”The Concerned Citizens of Shell Bluff was founded in 2010 and is a chapter of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League.  The League has chapters and projects in seven states and has worked for three decades to protect public health and the environment.

League Calls for Ban on Fracking in Public Forests:

Jan. 5, 2015: Today in a letter to the United States Forests Service, The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League (BREDL) released a statement calling for a ban on all hydraulic fracturing and oil and gas development activities in national forests, as well as restricted use of timber harvest and production, chemical treatment, and prescribed burning, with special protections for designated Wilderness Areas. The statement by BREDL’s Executive Director, Lou Zeller, was submitted to the Forest Supervisor for the National Forests of North Carolina, Kristin Bail, in response to the public comment period for the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests 15 Year Plan Draft Revision. The final plan will determine the standards, outcomes and desired conditions for Nantahala and Pisgah Forests, which together span over one million acres in western NC along the Appalachian Mountains in eighteen counties.

http://www.bredl.org/press/2015/USFS_PressRelease010515KD.pdf  


http://www.bredl.org/pdf5/USFS_Public_Comments_BREDL010515.pdf 


Sunday, November 30, 2014

Between the Lines: BLACK FRIDAYS

BLACK FRIDAYS

By Therese Vick
Works at Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League
Attended Wake Technical Community College




Friends,
As we are celebrating the conspicuous
consumption holi-day after Thanksgiving, I thought I would introduce you to a
different "Black Friday." On Friday,
November 14, 2014
, residents and some local officials of Lee and Chatham
Counties were stunned to learn that Duke Energy planned on dumping millions of
tons of coal ash in old clay mines located there. Chatham and Lee counties are
already targeted for fracking, and now they are being targeted again by dirty
energy. Duke Energy and the North Carolina are touting this as the
"reuse" of coal ash- in truth the plan is establishing coal ash
landfills while not being required to follow many of the requirements that
would be placed on the siting of a municipal solid waste landfill in any North
Carolina county-including requiring local approval. On Friday, November 21, 2014, Duke
Energy's contractor and the owner of the sites, Charah, Inc., submitted
applications to the Division of Waste Management (DWM), and the Division of
Energy, Mines, and Land Resources (DEMLR) to develop the old mines as
"structural fills," On Wednesday,
November 26, 2014
 (let's just
call it a Friday news dump being the day before the Thanksgiving holiday) The
North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) released
a press statement which said, in part:
"Duke Energy announced Nov. 13 its intentions to reuse coal
ash by shipping some of it from the Riverbend Steam Station in Mount Holly and
the L.V. Sutton Steam Electric Plant in Wilmington to the open-pit clay mines
in Chatham and Lee counties. The utility has also announced plans to reuse some
coal ash at its Asheville Power Plant at an existing lined structural fill
project at the Asheville Regional Airport and to reuse some of the coal ash
from the Dan River facility at an existing lined landfill in Jetersville,
Va."


After reviewing both
applications to DEMLR and DWM, the numbers being reported in the media and the
press release by DENR don't seem to match up.
From the permit documents submitted to DENR:
Lee County: DEMLR and DWM Applications
10: Number of years for which the mining
permit is requested.
8,800,000 tons: Quantity of coal ash to be disposed of.
Power Generation Facilities Located in North Carolina and South Carolina: Proposed service areas the coal ash may
come from.
Chatham County: DEMLR and DWM Applications
10: Number of years for which the mining
permit is requested.
12,800,000 tons: Quantity of coal ash to be disposed of.
Power Generation Facilities Located in North Carolina and South Carolina: Proposed service areas the coal ash may
come from.
Both the sites raise questions of environmental justice. There are
questions of who knew what and when they knew it. Why the legislation passed
this summer was widely considered dead and came back to life like a zombie.
DENR and Duke may try and use pretty words- but the fact remains that millions
of tons of coal ash-and its liability- are being dumped on Lee and Chatham
counties.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Citizens Group Officially Asks for Property Protection

Citizens Group Officially Asks for Property Protection



 Thursday, the Watauga Citizens for Local Control, formed in the wake of Boone being stripped of Extraterritorial Jurisdiction or ETJ powers, officially requested that the Watauga County Board of Commissioners adopt a buffer zone of 1,500 feet between polluting industries and residential dwellings, commercial buildings and churches.  The group’s release said that augmented buffer zones, or setbacks, would better protect people from smoke, noise and health risks caused by asphalt plants, electric power facilities, fuel storage tanks and other industrial facilities.  The county already requires such setbacks from daycare centers, schools and nursing homes.  The author of the group’s formal letter, Annette Reeves, stated of request to the county commission, “The citizens of Watauga deserve to live in a healthy, peaceful environment.”  The Watauga Citizens for Local Control release says they’ve followed closely the recent planning board hearings and meetings on the county taking over the Town of Boone’s extraterritorial jurisdiction.  Although they say they’re generally pleased with the proceedings, the citizen’s group wants more than a cursory consideration of protections for residential areas.  Butch Reeves, a member of the citizen’s group, said, “We need the Planning Board and the County Commissioners to continue to step up and protect our citizens.”      The citizen’s request pointed out that the overwhelming consensus of residents who attended recent planning board hearings favored a high impact land use moratorium and a strengthened county ordinance.  The moratorium would allow the county time to replace the protections that were lost when the NC General Assembly took away Boone’s power of extraterritorial jurisdiction.   In support of the request, Lou Zeller, Executive Director of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, said, “People spend most of their time in their own homes.  They should not be assaulted by smoke, noise and pollution.”  He added that the additional buffer zones would also protect private property values and the sanctuary of religious meetings.  Watauga Citizens for Local Control became a League chapter in response to the removal of ETJ protections. The town of Boone is challenging the removal of its ETJ powers in court. 

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Massive public input on fracking delays report on comments

Massive public input on fracking delays report on comments

Public input gathered at a series of statewide hearings on fracking rules was supposed to be presented in a report to the N.C. Mining and Energy Commission last week, but the meeting was delayed to give hearing officers more time to finish the report.The new meeting is rescheduled for this week on Nov. 6-7. Meetings could also be scheduled for Nov. 14 and 17 if necessary. The decision to postpone the original meeting date was prompted in part by a greater-than-expected number of comments that came in during the public input period, particularly in the final few days of the comment period, and the report thus took longer to compile, said Vikram Rao, chairman of the commission.In all, the MEC received 217,285 comments on draft rules. The actual number of individuals who commented could be less, according to a press release, because the way the comments were calculated allowed for an individual letter to contain multiple comments. During the four public hearings, three members of the MEC served as hearing officers. The November meetings will allow the full commission to consider the report, which will include documentation about each public hearing, and consider the 217,000 comments. Before hearing the report, the MEC will discuss a formal petition, submitted by the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, requesting rules to control and monitor air emissions during oil and gas development. 


Officials question pipeline benefit - Chatham Star Tribune: News

Officials question pipeline benefit - Chatham Star Tribune: News

Mara Robbins, a Floyd County resident and representative of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League and Piedmont Residents in Defense of the Environment, also addressed supervisors.Robbins accused EQT and NextEra of violating landowners’ property rights and expressed concerns about the effects of the pipeline on insurance and mortgage rates.“Many landowners feel their rights have been compromised because they don’t get to decide,” she said.Robbins said the pipeline will mean little benefit to the area and few local jobs because pipeline construction is highly specialized work.She also cited concerns about air pollution, alleging natural gas compressor stations emit formaldehyde.Robbins asked for an environmental impact study on Williams’ Chatham compressor station, which is the end point for the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

BREDL The League Line

BREDL The League Line



Natural Gas, Unnatural Disaster. Sand Mining-New Fracking Threat to NC www.theleagueline.org Quarterly Newsletter from BREDL

Monday, September 29, 2014

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League



GROUPS TAKE LEGAL ACTION TO HALT LICENSING OF 24 NUCLEAR PLANTS CITE FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH COURT RULING

Today a coalition of 17 public interest groups filed legal actions to halt the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission’s licensing of two dozen power plants.  The actions
were taken in response to the NRC’s failure comply with the US Court of Appeals
DC Circuit order which held that the Commission must assess the long-term
impacts of radioactive waste storage before issuing any new power plant
licenses. 
The petition states: “The NRC lacks a lawful basis under the Atomic Energy Act for
issuing or renewing an operating license in this proceeding because it has not
made currently valid findings of confidence or reasonable assurance that the
hundreds of tons of highly radioactive spent fuel that will be generated during
any reactor’s 40-year license term or 20-year license renewal term can be
safely disposed....”  Group representatives said that if the NRC did not
halt the licensing of power plants they would return to federal court.
Diane Curran, the lead attorney for this action, said:  “NRC has long
acknowledged that before licensing a reactor, the Atomic Energy Act requires it
to make Waste Confidence findings that spent fuel can be safely disposed of in
a geologic repository at some point in the future.  The NRC even said it
would not license a reactor if it could not make such a finding.  Yet, the
NRC has now arbitrarily dropped those findings from its regulations, claiming
they are not necessary.” 
Expert opinions supporting today’s legal actions were provided an energy specialist
and an economist.  Dr. Arjun Makhijani, president of the Institute for
Energy and Environmental Research, said, “Until the NRC has studied the
technical feasibility and environmental impacts of spent fuel disposal, it
should avoid making licensing decisions that would allow the generation of more
highly radioactive spent reactor fuel.  Spent nuclear fuel remains highly
dangerous for thousands of years.  It has long-lived radioactive materials
in it that can seriously contaminate the environment and harm public health if
released.”
Dr. Mark Cooper, senior fellow for Economic Analysis at the Institute for Energy and the
Environment at Vermont Law School, said “If the NRC were to include the costs
of spent fuel storage and disposal in its cost-benefit analyses for reactor
licensing and re-licensing decisions, these costs easily could tip the balance
of the analysis in favor of other alternatives.”     
Louis Zeller, Executive Director of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, one
of the 17 groups, said, “The NRC has disregarded the interests of residents living
near nuclear power plants across the nation.  Unless the Commission
reverses course, an appeal to a higher authority is inevitable.”  The
League challenged seven of the reactor licenses located in Virginia, South
Carolina, Tennessee and Alabama.
In addition to the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, groups submitting NRC filings
today are Beyond Nuclear, Citizens Allied for Safe Energy, Citizens
Environmental Alliance of Southwestern Ontario, Citizens for Alternatives to
Chemical Contamination, Don’t Waste Michigan, Ecology Party of Florida, Friends
of the Coast, Green Party of Ohio, Missouri Coalition for the Environment,
National Parks Conservation Association, New England Coalition, Nuclear
Information and Resource Service,  San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace, SEED
Coalition, the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter, and Southern Alliance for Clean
Energy.
The 24 pending nuclear power reactor licenses that would be
affected by today’s action are located at Bellefonte, Callaway, Comanche Peak,
Davis-Besse, Diablo Canyon, Fermi, Levy County, North Anna, Sequoyah, South
Texas Project, Turkey Point, Watts Bar and William States Lee. 



Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Need a fracking supporter? Hire a homeless person. | Grist

Need a fracking supporter? Hire a homeless person. | Grist

In bizarre energy industry news of the day, the North Carolina Energy
Coalition seems to have brought in some homeless men to stand in as
fracking supporters at a state hearing on developing fracking operations
in the state.


The men were bussed 200 miles from Winston-Salem to Cullowhee, N.C., where the hearing took place, for the day.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Regulators reject call for nuke plant shutdown - US News

Regulators reject call for nuke plant shutdown - US News

Michael Peck, who for five years was Diablo Canyon's lead NRC inspector, said in a confidential report disclosed by The Associated Press last month that no one knows whether the plant's equipment can withstand strong shaking from those faults — the potential for which was realized decades after the facility was built. Peck, now a senior reactor instructor for the NRC in Tennessee, argued the NRC is not applying safety rules it set out for the plant's operation. The decision was issued on the same day that PG&E released hundreds of pages of scientific research that found a fault 650 yards from the reactors, the Shoreline, is twice as long as initially believed, making it capable of producing potentially stronger earthquakes, and connections between some faults could create larger earthquakes than previously considered.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Polluters are "hijacking our democracy," according to retired military general who took control of Hurricane Katrina emergency relief efforts in 2005 - Ripple Effect

Polluters are "hijacking our democracy," according to retired military general who took control of Hurricane Katrina emergency relief efforts in 2005 - Ripple Effect

Nice to see someone telling it like it is for a change. That Big Industry is screwing up this Planet for Profit and doesn't give a flip... Too many lobbyists and too many Politicians who are there for one reason to represent the Big Boys and give them what they want to keep them happy at our and Natures expense. 

Fracking hearing Friday could draw big crowd

Fracking hearing Friday could draw big crowd

Climate Alarms Ringing, UN Fails To Act

Climate Alarms Ringing, UN Fails To Act

Over its history, the COP process has failed to produce significant reductions in GHGs and instead has become increasingly dominated by corporations seeking to profit from the climate crisis. The decisions made by the COP reflect business interests rather than the needs and interests of civil society. In fact, civil society groups are being excluded more and more from the process. And major decisions are being made by private entities and dominant countries behind closed doors.A misleading program known as "Sustainable Energy 4 All" pushed damaging and dirty biofuels, hydroelectric dams, fossil fuels, methane gas, waste incinerators and nuclear power. Read more about these false solutions in The Green Shock Doctrine.

Friday, September 5, 2014

Environmental group pushing for Hyde Park move outs

Environmental group pushing for Hyde Park move outs

An environmental group, the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League
sent this letter to the mayor wanting to speed the move outs up.


"They need to have some hope that they will be
able to leave this area," said Charles Utley with Blue Ridge
Environmental Defense League.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

GROUP RELEASES "WAITING IN A CESSPOOL" Calls for Prompt Action to Evacuate Remaining Residents

Sept. 3, 2014: The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League has called
upon officials in Augusta to take immediate steps to move the families
still living in the contaminated Hyde Park neighborhood to safer
housing. In a letter addressed to the mayor, Charles Utley, Augusta
resident and Campaign Director for BREDL, said, “The residents Hyde Park
seek only justice and fulfillment of promises made. We are appealing
to you to use the power of your office to protect public health and
safety. We started this project, let’s finish it.”



BREDL Press Release | Letter to Augusta Mayor

Friday, August 29, 2014

League calls for additional hearings on fracking - Yadkin Ripple - yadkinripple.com

League calls for additional hearings on fracking - Yadkin Ripple - yadkinripple.com

UPDATE 2-Cameco to shut world's largest uranium mine in labor dispute | Reuters

UPDATE 2-Cameco to shut world's largest uranium mine in labor dispute | Reuters

 Aug 27 (Reuters) - Canadian uranium miner Cameco Corp will shut the world's biggest uranium mine at McArthur River, Saskatchewan on Saturday, barring a last-minute labor settlement, after the United Steelworkers union said workers would go on strike.Cameco on Wednesday said it issued a lockout notice at the mine and the Key Lake mill. The work stoppage would involve 535 unionized workers at the two sites.A shutdown would reduce some of the world's excess uranium supply, Cantor Fitzgerald analyst Rob Chang said in a note. But it may weaken Cameco's earnings as the company is forced to buy uranium from higher-cost sources, Chang said.Cameco shares fell 2.8 percent in Toronto and 2.2 percent in New York in morning trading.Uranium spot prices are near a nine-year low, as Japan, previously a major producer of nuclear-fueled electricity, has been slow to approve reactor re-starts after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in 2011.Saskatoon, Saskatchewan-based Cameco, the world's third-largest uranium miner, said a labor disruption would not affect the company's 2014 uranium delivery commitments, as it can draw on a variety of supply sources.McArthur River's capacity of 18 million pounds of uranium annually represents 12 percent of global mine supply, said BMO Capital Markets analyst Edward Sterck, who forecasts an oversupply of uranium through 2017.France's Areva SA owns minority stakes in both the McArthur River mine and the Key Lake mill, which processes ore from McArthur.In response to the union's strike notice, Cameco issued a lockout notice effective at 12:01 a.m. Central time (0501 GMT) on Saturday. Cameco spokesman Gord Struthers declined to say what the outstanding issues are as talks continue with the union. The previous contract expired on Dec. 31, 2013.Mike Pulak, a United Steelworkers representative in Saskatoon for Local 8914, said the parties will continue to meet to try and resolve the issues.The last strike at a Cameco site was in 2009, when United Steelworkers members walked off the job at a fuel manufacturing facility in Ontario. It lasted about three months.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Hyde Park Relocation - Augusta, Georgia



Published on Aug 28, 2014
WAITING IN A CESSPOOL
In 1969 the
Richmond County Health Department advised residents of Hyde Park their
well water was unsafe because of industrial pollution. Four decades
later, relocation of the community was finally approved. However, only
half of the 130 families have been moved to safety. The video essay,
“Waiting in a Cesspool” tells the story of those who have been left
behind. Hyde Park residents seek only justice and fulfillment of
promises made.


Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League

ALERT!... Important NNSA hearings will be held in Athens and Chattanooga, TN on Sept. 9th and 10th respectively. You can read about them on our MATRR Calendar. The meetings will address the environmental impact of the production of tritium for nuclear weapons at Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant (and optionally at the Sequoyah Plant 18 miles upstream of Chattanooga). DOE and TVA have broken international precedent by using commercial civilian nuclear power reactors to produce nuclear weapons material for the Defense Department. Proliferation concerns begin at home. The revised Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) estimates this civilian tritium production will release 10,000 Curies of radioactive tritium into the Tennessee River annually. Because tritium bonds with water, irradiating it, the tritium cannot be filtered; and therefore enters Chattanooga drinking water from the Tennessee River.  This ongoing production also necessitates transporting the nuclear fuel to the Savannah River Site in south Georgia. This TVA tritium production issue needs your voices of opposition. The deadline for public comments on this disturbing ongoing production by TVA is Sept. 22.  Don Safer sent these alert links: OREPA http://orepa.org/public-comment-period-on-nnsa-tritium-plan-open-now/  and Savannah River Site Watch http://orepa.org/public-comment-period-on-nnsa-tritium-plan-open-now/. The Official NNSA link is http://nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/ouroperations/generalcounsel/nepaoverview/nepa/tritiumseis.

best@matrr.org

Bellefonte Efficiency & Sustainability Team (BEST)
Mothers Against Tennessee River Radiation (MATRR)

MATRR.org - Because Energy Matters

Clean Up “America’s Secret Fukushima”, The US Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUMs) | Global Research

Clean Up “America’s Secret Fukushima”, The US Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUMs) | Global Research

“Currently no laws require clean up of these dangerous abandoned Uranium
mines. We are letting Congress know: It is time to clean up the mines!
We value persistence. We will employ a variety of tactics including
legislative and judicial avenues to hold the government and corporations
accountable for their negligence and community-based actions to raise
awareness and clean up the mines.”

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

California Lawsuit Seeks Pollution Cuts From Massive Tree-burning Power Plant | Energy Justice Network

California Lawsuit Seeks Pollution Cuts From Massive Tree-burning Power Plant | Energy Justice Network

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit today challenging a Clean Air Act permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency for a massive, 31-megawatt biomass power plant proposed by Sierra Pacific Industries in Anderson, Calif. The challenge, filed directly in the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, charges the EPA with failing to control climate-warming carbon dioxide pollution from the plant.“Tree-burning power plants foul the air, damage the climate, and threaten our forests,” said Kevin Bundy, a senior attorney with the Center’s Climate Law Institute. “For too long the EPA has acted as if carbon pollution from biomass doesn’t exist. But you can’t fool the atmosphere. Carbon from burning trees still warms the climate.”The Clean Air Act requires the “best available control technology” for carbon pollution from large facilities like the Anderson plant. The EPA’s permit, however, treated biomass combustion itself as a “control technology” — even though the facility is primarily designed to burn biomass.“The EPA’s decision makes no sense,” Bundy said. “You can’t control the pollution from burning trees by burning trees, any more than you can control the pollution from burning coal by burning coal.”The EPA’s permit also failed to consider whether the facility should be limited to less carbon-intensive fuels — such as amply available mill waste — rather than being allowed to burn whole trees.Burning wood for power releases about three times as much carbon dioxide per megawatt-hour as natural gas and is even more carbon-intensive than coal. Depending on the material, biomass power generation can increase atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for decades or centuries compared to what otherwise would have happened to the material.Burning whole trees that otherwise would have been left to grow in the forest, for example, can increase climate pollution for many years, even if the power generated replaces reliance on fossil fuels.“Biomass is touted as a clean, green and renewable source of energy, but the reality on the ground and in the air is different,” Bundy said. “The EPA can’t give these inefficient, dirty facilities a free pass on carbon pollution.”The case is titled Center for Biological Diversity v. EPA. The Center is represented by attorneys Kevin Bundy and Brendan Cummings.

Inside Scoop: Speakers say fracking rules not good enough (videos) - News-Record.com: Killian, Lehmert, Poe: The Inside Scoop

Inside Scoop: Speakers say fracking rules not good enough (videos) - News-Record.com: Killian, Lehmert, Poe: The Inside Scoop

Monday, August 25, 2014

M2.4 - 4km NE of Blowing Rock, North Carolina 2014-08-24 23:16:20 UTC

M2.4 - 4km NE of Blowing Rock, North Carolina 2014-08-24 23:16:20 UTC

Did you feel the NC Earthquake!? M2.4  - 4km NE of Blowing Rock, North Carolina 2014-08-24 23:16:20 UTC (via @usgs) http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/se082514a#summary

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

ETJ Residents Overflow Watauga Commission

ETJ Residents Overflow Watauga Commission

 Lou Zeller, of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League asked for a
development moratorium and a law similar to one in Ashe, reading from
it, “Location of a polluting industry, both portable and permanent,
shall not be within 1000 feet of a residential dwelling unit or a
commercial building, or within 1320 feet of any school, daycare,
hospital or nursing home facility.”

As public hearings begin on NC fracking rules, environmental groups offer appraisals

As public hearings begin on NC fracking rules, environmental groups offer appraisals

The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, a nonprofit that's part of the Frack-Free NC alliance, has prepared its own fact sheet
as background for those interested in submitting public comments. BREDL
criticizes the rules for failing to control or monitor toxic air
emissions from fracking sites, for not requiring full disclosure of
chemicals used in the fracking process, and for not addressing the
handling of fracking waste.

NC Reviews Coastal Seismic Testing Proposal | WUNC

NC Reviews Coastal Seismic Testing Proposal | WUNC

They will use up to 36 seismic air guns, which release highly
pressurized blasts of air.  Environmentalists have said that will injure
marine life and could disrupt migration patterns.

Division of
Coastal Management spokeswoman Michele Walker says it's not clear how
the blasts would affect wildlife, but the agency is also considering the
timing of the project.

"This testing would be performed, really, in the middle of prime fishing season in September and October," Walker says.

"And
they'd be out in the middle of prime fishing waters.  They would be in
Oregon Inlet and Big Rock off of Beaufort, a lot of locations where the
fishermen will be during that time of year.  We think that could be a
concern to that community as well."

"Because this particular
survey would involve a source vessel that's deploying 18 to 36 seismic
air guns, we thought it was important that the public know about this
and be able to comment on it.  It's the same type of testing that would
be used for searching for offshore oil and gas deposits, although that's
not what they're looking for during this survey."

The Division
of Coastal Management is accepting comments through the end of this
week.  It will then decide whether the project is in line with state
policies.



Uranium mine hearings begin in Rapid City

Uranium mine hearings begin in Rapid City

RAPID CITY — A licensing board of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission will begin the first of three days of hearings in Rapid City
on Tuesday for a proposed uranium mine in western South Dakota.

The
Atomic Safety and Licensing Board will hold its hearings on challenges
to the proposed Dewey-Burdock uranium mine at the Alex Johnson Hotel.
The mine is being proposed by Powertech Uranium Corp.

Environmental
opponents say the mine could pollute or drain the region’s aquifers.
Native American opponents say it could hurt cultural and historical
sites in the Black Hills.



Foundation for Chernobyl cover

Foundation for Chernobyl cover

After all these years, still trying to fix the damage...

Banking on nuclear

Banking on nuclear







Banks won’t lend for new nuclear projects. Industry wants
tax-payers to fund them

 


Banking on nuclear



 Nuclear industry’s survival hangs on tax-payer funding

– World Nuclear News


South Korea running out of space for nuclear waste - Australia Network News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

South Korea running out of space for nuclear waste - Australia Network News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Commission chairman Hong Doo-seung says it is urgent to find more storage sites for spent fuel.

"We
will have to stop nuclear power generation if we fail to find
additional temporary space, which would be the second-best option," he
said.

Mr Hong says efforts to store spent fuel more densely in
temporary storage would simply earn time and can not be the ultimate
solution.

South Korea has 23 nuclear reactors which supply about a
third of its power and produce about 750 tonnes of spent fuel each
year.

According to the commission, at the end of last year, 13,254
tonnes of spent fuel was being held in temporary storage at nuclear
plants.

Seoul has been under pressure to cut its reliance on
nuclear power since late 2012 when safety scandals led to the temporary
shutdown of reactors to replace parts supplied with fake certificates.



7News Investigates: Security at Seabrook Nuclear Plant - 7News Boston WHDH-TV

7News Investigates: Security at Seabrook Nuclear Plant - 7News Boston WHDH-TV

An unmanned gate may not be the only concern: a recent study initiated
by the defense department claims significant security gaps exist at the
nation's nuclear power plants.


Tuesday, August 19, 2014

140716_Residents call for frack-free WNC - 140716_Residents_call_for_frack-free_WNC.pdf

Residents call for frack-free WNC - 140716_Residents_call_for_frack-free_WNC.pdf

Residents call for Frack-Free WNC : BREDL Executive Director Lou Zeller spoke during a fracking Q&A session in Marshall, NC.  View The News-Record (Madison County) article 

Monday, August 18, 2014

NC fracking hearings get underway Wednesday in Raleigh | CharlotteObserver.com

NC fracking hearings get underway Wednesday in Raleigh | CharlotteObserver.com

I’m not sure than any of our proposed rules are strong,” said Therese Vick, community activist with the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League. “Any time we had something that was too onerous or too expensive for the industry or the politicians, they went back and modified it.” Public comment is also being accepted in writing until Sept. 30, without the time or length restrictions of spoken comments. As of Thursday, 656 comments had arrived at the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/17/5112547/nc-fracking-hearings-get-underway.html#storylink=cpy

Delays for SC nuclear plant further pressure industry; questions over potential delays in Ga. - Business - Nanaimo Daily News

Delays for SC nuclear plant further pressure industry; questions over potential delays in Ga. - Business - Nanaimo Daily News

The latest announcement came this week from executives at SCANA Corp., which has been warned by its builders the startup of the first of two new reactors in South Carolina could be delayed two years or more. SCANA Corp. and plant co-owner Santee Cooper have not accepted that timeline from the companies designing and building the reactors, nor have they accepted responsibility for additional costs.That announcement may well foreshadow more delays for a sister project in eastern Georgia, and they have caught the attention of regulators and Wall Street."Delays generally cause cost increases, and the question becomes who's going to bear the costs?" said C. Dukes Scott, executive director of the South Carolina Office of Regulatory Staff, a watchdog agency that monitors SCANA Corp.'s spending.None of this is helpful for the nuclear power industry, which had hoped its newest generation of plants in Georgia and South Carolina would prove it could build without the delays and cost overruns so endemic years ago. When construction slows down, it costs more money to employ the thousands of workers needed to build a nuclear plant. Meanwhile, interest charges add up on the money borrowed to finance construction.A single day of delay in Georgia could cost $2 million, according to an analysis by utility regulators.Utility consumers often end up paying for these extra charges in the form of pricier electricity bills, unless the government intervenes and forces shareholders to absorb all or some of the losses. Despite previous delays and problems, regulators in both states have previously said finishing the nuclear plants is cheaper than stopping and building gas-fired power plants."People take it seriously because really the operative word is uncertainty," said Paul Patterson, an analyst for Glenrock Associates. "This is a large and complicated project and any significant delay has the potential to raise expenses."Originally, the first of SCANA Corp.'s two new reactors was supposed to start commercial operation in April 2016. The company later moved that target startup date to early 2017.- See more at: http://www.nanaimodailynews.com/business/delays-for-sc-nuclear-plant-further-pressure-industry-questions-over-potential-delays-in-ga-1.1316089#sthash.Yp8aLYvT.0JBhfudT.dpuf

INSIGHT-The cost of caring for Europe's elderly nuclear plants

INSIGHT-The cost of caring for Europe's elderly nuclear plants

Apart from reducing the reliability of Europe's electricity supply, operators stand to lose many millions of euros from a single outage from lost electricity sales alone.Reuters calculations, based on industry estimates of lost daily electricity sales, show the outages at two EDF Energy plants could cost the firm some 155 million pounds during the outages from when they began in June or August to October, not including the costs of inspection and maintenance work.Industry sources say the lost revenue from the loss of output at a 1 gigawatt plant could reach 1 million pounds a day.British utility Centrica, which owns 20 percent of EDF Energy's nuclear fleet, said on Monday the reduction in output would reduce its earnings per share by around 0.3 pence this year.More than half of Belgium's nuclear capacity is offline for maintenance. The three closed reactors are 29, 31 and 32 years old.Though it doesn't break out the nuclear data separately, statistics from Europe's electricity industry association Eurelectric show both planned and unplanned outages mostly increased at thermal power plants in eight European countries examined, and periods of energy unavailability increased from around 12.8 percent in 2002 to 18.3 percent in 2011.As the plants age, that can only increase. ($1 = 0.7458 euro) ($1 = 0.5994 British pound) (Additional reporting by Barbara Lewis in Brussels and Geert de Clercq in Paris; Editing by Will Waterman)

Friday, August 15, 2014

Duke cited for Oconee nuclear safety lapse

Duke cited for Oconee nuclear safety lapse

The November crack is the second apparent violation the company has
faced in the past year, when regulators threatened civil fines for the
company's repeated missed deadlines in updating fire-protection
standards at Oconee.



The agency declined to impose civil fines but
ordered Duke to adhere to a strict deadline to update protection
standards by November 2016.



Thursday, August 7, 2014

Report: Nuclear Share of Global Energy Production Is Lowest Since 1984 | POWER Magazine

Report: Nuclear Share of Global Energy Production Is Lowest Since 1984 | POWER Magazine

While 67 reactors are under construction in 14 different countries, at least 49 of them have encountered construction delays, with eight being “under construction” for more than 20 years.   Capital costs for construction have escalated from roughly $1,000 per installed kilowatt a decade ago to what is expected to be around $8,000 per installed kilowatt for two new units at the Hinkley Point facility in the UK. The report also compared market trends between nuclear power and renewable energy. As the world looks for carbon-friendly alternatives to fossil fuel generation, these two resources have become direct competitors for deployment. However, wind and solar seem to be winning the battle for new capacity.

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Opponents paint a grim picture of fracking - Local News - WS Journal

Opponents paint a grim picture of fracking - Local News - WS Journal

The state doesn’t have adequate safeguards to
protect local residents’ health and safety from fracking, she said. And
oil and gas companies can legally erode property rights of landowners to
drill on their property for natural gas, Fielding added.
Therese
Vick, an official with the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League,
said she was concerned about the chemicals that energy companies could
use to extract natural gas.
“They would be using so many chemicals that it creates a toxic cocktail,” Vick said.
John Bennes, a Cooleemee resident, attended the meeting. He urged the audience to take steps to stop fracking.
“I
think we all agreed that fracking is wrong,” Bennes said. “We as human
beings should protect this planet. Fracking will ruin the planet.”

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Court rules against Barnwell nuclear waste dump | Local News | The State

Court rules against Barnwell nuclear waste dump | Local News | The State



Good grief! ....  The ruling took aim at concrete vaults that were added to burial trenches in the 1990s. Much of the waste goes into the vaults. But those vaults have HOLES ????  that allow toxin-polluted water to drain out. These holes permit water that has come in contact with residual tritium to drain into the trenches, which in turn allow the water to percolate into the soil and groundwater beneath the facility,’’ the court said. “Chem-Nuclear has not taken action to reduce to the smallest possible amount the migration of waste-contaminated water out of its vaults and trenches.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2014/07/30/3592960/court-rules-against-barnwell-nuclear.html?sp=/99/205/&ihp=1#storylink=cpy

Saturday, August 2, 2014

UN, Japan, Concealing Extent of Fukushima Catastrophe

UN, Japan, Concealing Extent of Fukushima Catastrophe

Dr.
Caldicott urged the public to "demand that TEPCO and the Japanese
government continually inform the public about the events that are and
will be occurring at the Fukushima reactors, without cover-ups and
denials of the facts."


Should another major release of radiation occur, she said, the public
must be informed immediately and evacuation begun immediately.

- See more at: http://mwcnews.net/focus/politics/44145-fukushima-catastrophe.html#sthash.5cgmPLZn.eZVo6fcJ.dpuf
Dr.
Caldicott urged the public to "demand that TEPCO and the Japanese
government continually inform the public about the events that are and
will be occurring at the Fukushima reactors, without cover-ups and
denials of the facts."


Should another major release of radiation occur, she said, the public
must be informed immediately and evacuation begun immediately.

- See more at: http://mwcnews.net/focus/politics/44145-fukushima-catastrophe.html#sthash.5cgmPLZn.eZVo6fcJ.dpuf


Dr.
Caldicott urged the public to "demand that TEPCO and the Japanese
government continually inform the public about the events that are and
will be occurring at the Fukushima reactors, without cover-ups and
denials of the facts."


Should another major release of radiation occur, she said, the public
must be informed immediately and evacuation begun immediately.

- See more at: http://mwcnews.net/focus/politics/44145-fukushima-catastrophe.html#sthash.5cgmPLZn.eZVo6fcJ.dpuf

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Monday, July 28, 2014

Nuclear Plants Should Focus on Risks Posed by External Events, Study Says - NYTimes.com

Nuclear Plants Should Focus on Risks Posed by External Events, Study Says - NYTimes.com

The study, ordered by Congress after the triple meltdown at Fukushima
Daiichi’s reactors, said that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the
American nuclear industry should focus on the main sources of risk:
accidents set off by “extreme external events,” like earthquakes or
floods; multiple human or equipment failures; and “violations of
operational protocols.” 

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Halliburton fracking spill mystery: What chemicals polluted an Ohio waterway? | Grist

Halliburton fracking spill mystery: What chemicals polluted an Ohio waterway? | Grist

Even in these cases, only emergency responders
and the chief of the ODNR’s oil and gas division, which is known to be
cozy with industry, are entitled to the information. And they are barred
from sharing it, even with environmental agencies
and public health officials. Environmental groups argue this makes it
impossible to adequately test for contamination or take other necessary
steps to protect public health. “Ohio is playing a dangerous game of
hide and seek with first responders and community safety,” says Teresa
Mills of the Virginia-based Center for Health, Environment, and Justice.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

DENR investigating landman behind Triangle fracking bids | News | Indy Week

DENR investigating landman behind Triangle fracking bids | News | Indy Week



As the Indy reported Wednesday, state law requires
representatives for gas and oil companies, otherwise known as "landmen,"
to register with DENR or risk a civil penalty. Frank Sides, the agent
named on the mineral rights offers of Crimson Holdings Incorporated,
does not appear to be registered in the state, based on DENR's online registry.


DENR spokesman Jamie Kritzer said his agency was only recently
informed of Sides' letters, and will be investigating to determine if he
is breaking the law. Sides did not return an Indy phone call this week.


Documents obtained by the Indy this week show Crimson Holdings made offers to buy mineral rights in Durham and Chapel Hill. In Durham, the company sought to buy the rights for several tracts of nature preserves owned by the conservationist Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association. In Chapel Hill, Crimson Holdings offered to buy more than 50 acres of land owned by the town of Chapel Hill in a park abutting the upscale Meadowmont development.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Nuclear watchdog agency considers repositioning staff as fewer plants built, others go offline | Fox Business

Nuclear watchdog agency considers repositioning staff as fewer plants built, others go offline | Fox Business

"Macfarlane said the agency may need new rules to govern decommissioned nuclear plants that no longer have radioactive fuel in their reactors, decreasing the chances of an accident or mishap. Already, utility companies that are shutting plants have requested loosening emergency preparedness and security rules designed for operating plants."There's no fuel in the reactor," Macfarlane said. "Do you really need guards around it anymore? No, you don't, probably." Say what Madame Chairperson? What about the spent fuel pools and dry storage area? Everything to support the nuclear industries bottom line - to hades with citizens health, welfare and security of spent fuel!
GARRY MORGAN
BREDL/BEST/MATRR
http://www.matrr.org 

Temporary Closing of Indian Point Power Plant Is Considered - WSJ

Temporary Closing of Indian Point Power Plant Is Considered - WSJ







Millions of fish and larvae are killed as Indian Point sucks in
2.5 billion gallons of Hudson River water daily to cool its plant components.
While the state and some environmentalists say Entergy should engineer a
closed-cycle cooling system—which would rely less on the river—the power
company says that idea is unfeasible and too costly.
Besides dying as they are sucked into the plant system, fish and
other aquatic life are harmed when they come into contact with warmer water
discharged back into the river by the plant, said Mr. Musegaas.